See Copyright guide

8. Examples of permission requests

Examples of permission requests

  1. Licence to publish (PDF, 48 kB)
    By signing the Licence to publish and sending it to the publisher the author grants the publisher a sole licence for certain copyright related acts which have an economic or commercial objective with respect to the article. 
    At the same time the author retains certain rights for various, scholarly purposes. This licence makes no difference between pre prints, post prints or published articles but stipulates that the published version of the author's article can be disseminated via an institutional or centralised repository immediately after publication in a journal or after an embargo period of maximum six months. 
    This licence can also be used in the case of multiple authors. One of the clauses deals with this. 

  2. Licence to deposit (PDF, 48 kB) 
    Work included in a digital repository may only be made available to third parties with the consent of the author. The author must thus grant consent to the holder of the digital repository to make his work permanently accessible. 
    One of the conditions set out in the Berlin Declaration is that work included in a digital repository is made subject to an irrevocable non-exclusive licence so that - on condition that the name of the author is indicated - unrestricted use can be made of the work, regardless of the medium or carrier.
     
    Where depositing a published version of a scientific/scholarly article is concerned, as well as associated elements such as files (including databases), models, and visualisations, the author can be guided by the following Principles: 
    1. Copyright in the work remains with the author;
    2. The author grants consent, by means of a licence, for the institution to hold his published version of a scientific/scholarly article and make it permanently accessible, as well as associated elements such as files (including databases), models, and visualisations;
    3. The provision of the work is in accordance with the open access condition set out in the Berlin Declaration;
    4. The licence becomes effective when the author has transferred the work to the repository;
    5. The licence is irrevocable;
    6. Once delivered, files will remain in the repository and may only be made inaccessible for weighty reasons, for example if they are contrary to public order or public morals;
    7. In consultation with the author, a published article may be made subject to an embargo lasting a maximum of six months, during which time it will not be accessible.

      A model Licence to Deposit has been drawn up based on these Principles. If so desired, this can be used without any changes; it can also be adapted to meet special wishes.
       
  3. Educational institutes have the right conform the reader agreement to re-use short parts of copyright protected material in their readers. To re-use larger parts you need permission from the publisher. The difference between small and big parts is formulated in Art. 2.2 of the Reader Agreement: 

    2.2 Korte gedeelten:
    1. Uit niet-literaire boekwerken: maximaal 10.000 woorden, mits niet meer omvattend dan een derde deel van het gehele oorspronkelijke werk waaruit wordt overgenomen;
    2. Uit tijdschriften en andere periodieke uitgaven met een niet-literaire inhoud: maximaal 8.000 woorden, mits niet meer omvattend dan een derde deel van de aflevering waaruit wordt overgenomen;
    3. Uit literaire geschriften: maximaal 100 regels poëzie of 2500 woorden proza, mits niet meer omvattend dan een tiende deel van het gehele oorspronkelijke werk.

  4. Some commercial publishers have pre-defined forms on their webpages e.g. Springer and Elsevier.